English


Office: Room 9408, 5057 Woodward; 313-577-2450
Chairperson: Richard Grusin
Associate Chairperson: Elizabeth S. Sklar
Academic Services Officer: Margaret M. Maday
Undergraduate Adviser: Royanne R. Smith

Website: http://www.english.wayne.edu

Combined Curriculum Requirements

Cognate Study in English

English (B.A. Program)

English Courses (ENG)

English: Minor

Film Studies (B.A. Program)

Film Studies: English Minor in

Folklore: English Minor in

Graduate Enrollment Program, Accelerated (AGRADE)

Honors in English

Programs, Degree

Scholarships

Professors

Ellen Barton, Lesley Brill, Robert Burgoyne, Walter F. Edwards, Henry L. Golemba, Richard Grusin, William A. Harris, Jerry Herron, Donna Landry, Christopher Leland, Kathryne Lindberg, Gerald MacLean, Arthur F. Marotti, Ruth E. Ray, John R. Reed, Michael H. Scrivener, Steven Shaviro, Elizabeth S. Sklar, Anca Vlasopolos, Renata M. Wasserman, Barrett Watten

Associate Professors

Robert Aguirre, Anthony Aristar, Cynthia Erb, Janet C. Langlois, Bernard Levine, Richard C. Marback, Geoffrey Nathan, Ljiljana Progovac, Ross J. Pudaloff, Frances Ranney, Martha Ratliff, Emmet Schmitt

Assistant Professors

Sarika Chandra, Jonathan Flatley, Gwendolen Gorzelsky, Kenneth Jackson, Sheila Lloyd, Bruce S. Morgan, Jeff Rice, Dana Seitler, Kirsten Thompson

Senior Lecturers

Todd Duncan, Carla Harryman, Margaret Jordan, Michael L. Liebler, Chris Tysh

Lecturers

Marta O. Dmytrenko-Ahrabian, Christopher Bierman, Dean-Michael Lynn, Sara Tipton

Director, English Language Institute

Bruce S. Morgan

Emeritus / Emerita Professors

Samuel Astrachan, Alvin B. Aubert, Esther M. Broner, Samuel A. Golden, Arnold L. Goldsmith, Yates Hafner, Orville F. Linck, Ralph L. Nash, Alfred Schwarz, Robert M. Strozier II, Marilyn L. Williamson, Beongcheon Yu

Emeritus / Emerita Associate Professors

Bradford S. Field, Jeanne A. Flood, Isabel Graham, David S. Herreshoff, William E. Mockler, Amy K. Richards, Edward Sharples, Paul Sporn, Travis E. Trittschuh

Programs, Degree

For specific requirements of Graduate Programs cited below (*), consult the Wayne State University Graduate Bulletin.

BACHELOR OF ARTS with a major in English
BACHELOR OF ARTS with a major in Film Studies
*MASTER OF ARTS with a major in English
*MASTER OF ARTS in Comparative Literature
*DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY with a major in English and concentrations in
American literature, English literature, literary criticism, and composition research

English (B.A. Program)

English Studies today includes many fields of inquiry and areas of textual theory and analysis. The English major curriculum is designed to introduce students to these fields and to provide a challenging and flexible liberal arts education as well as a preprofessional program for students interested in careers in education, law, business, and other professions.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS for this program are satisfied by the general requirements for undergraduate admission to the University; see: Admission Requirements and ACT Score Requirement.

ADVISING: The Associate Chairperson of the Department and the Undergraduate Adviser provide advising to English majors. As soon as possible, and no later than the completion of sixty credits, the prospective major should consult one of the advisers in the Department to discuss a course of study. E-mail advising is available at: advise@lists.wayne.edu

English majors and minors are NOT exempt from the English Proficiency Examination in Composition.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Candidates for the bachelor's degree must complete 120 credits in course work including satisfaction of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Group Requirements (see: Group Requirements) and the University General Education Requirements (see: General Education Requirements), as well as the major requirements listed below. All course work must be completed in accordance with the academic procedures of the University and the College governing undergraduate scholarship and degrees; see: Bachelor's Degree Requirements, Academic Regulations, University, and Bachelor's Degree Requirements: Liberal Arts and Sciences.

CREDIT LIMITATIONS: NO MORE than forty-six credits in the major field may count toward degree requirements. With the adviser's approval, appropriate English 5990 (Directed Study) credit may count toward a major.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS consist of twelve English courses beyond the University General Education competency requirement (see: English Proficiency Requirement (EP)), and Liberal Arts Group Requirements (see: Group Requirements). Ten of these courses must be beyond the 2000 level. Specific requirements are as follows:

1. English 3100, Introduction to Literary Studies, Cr. 3.

2. Three courses in English and American literature:

ENG 3110 -- (PL) English Literature to 1700: Cr. 3.
ENG 3120 -- (PL) English Literature after 1700: Cr. 3.
ENG 3140 -- (PL) Survey of American Literature: Cr. 3.

3. One upper-division course with an emphasis on theory in one of the following areas: composition theory, literary or cultural theory, film theory, folklore theory, linguistic theory, rhetorical theory (ENG 5040, 5080, 5090, 5600, 5700, 5740, 5750, or 5790).

4. One upper-division course in cross-disciplinary or comparative studies in one of the following areas: comparative literature, gender studies, African-American literature, film, cultural studies, folklore, or creative writing (ENG 5030, 5050, 5060, 5070, 5480, 5580, 5590, 5650, 5670, 5870, 5880, or 5890).

5. English 5992, Senior Seminar, Cr. 4. This course with co-registration in English 5993 fulfills the General Education Writing Intensive requirement. With the consent of the Associate Chairperson and the appropriate instructor, students are occasionally permitted to substitute a 5000-level course, with English 5993 co-registration, for the Senior Seminar and to fulfill the Writing Intensive requirement.

6. In addition to the above requirements, majors must take at least five other English courses for a minimum of 36 credits (46 credits maximum). Three of these five courses must be at the 4000 or 5000 level. The Department recommends that students preparing themselves for graduate work in literature choose course work that will expose them to a broad historical range of English and American texts. Students who wish to teach English on the secondary school level are advised to take a course in Shakespeare (ENG 2200 or 5150), courses in American literature beyond the basic major requirements, and an advanced course in linguistics. Students are free to select courses in any of the fields of English studies and to emphasize any one of the areas covered by the Department's course offerings.

Honors in English

The English Department participates in the Liberal Arts Honors Program. To graduate with honors in English an undergraduate student must have a minimum 3.5 g.p.a. in English.

Honors requirements include a minimum of thirty-six credits in English courses beyond the Liberal Arts and Sciences Group requirements and General Education requirements, twelve credits of which must be in Honors courses. The required English courses are:

1. English 3100, Introduction to Literary Studies, Cr. 3

2. Three courses in English and American literature:

ENG 3110 -- (PL) English Literature to 1700: Cr. 3
ENG 3120 -- (PL) English Literature after 1700: Cr. 3
ENG 3140 -- (PL) Survey of American Literature: Cr. 3

3. One upper-division course with an emphasis on theory in one of the following areas: composition theory, literary or cultural theory, film theory, folklore theory, linguistic theory, rhetorical theory (ENG 5040, 5080, 5090, 5600, 5700, 5740, 5750, or 5790)

4. One upper-division course in cross-disciplinary or comparative studies in one of the following areas: comparative literature, gender studies, African-American literature, film, cultural studies, folklore, or creative writing (English 5030, 5050, 5060, 5070, 5480, 5580, 5590, 5650, 5670, 5870, 5880, or 5890)

5. English 4991, Honors Seminar, Cr. 3-6. This course with co-registration in English 5993 fulfills the General Education Writing Intensive requirement.

6. In addition to the above requirements, majors must take at least five other English courses for a minimum of 36 credits (46 credits maximum). Three of these five courses must be at the 4000 or 5000 level and include English 4992 (Honors Project, Cr. 3). The Honors Project should be twenty to thirty pages long. It may be in any area comprised by the broad field of English.

7. At least one 4200-level interdepartmental Honors Seminar, Honors 4200-4280

8. Honors-Option: one course in the English Honors curriculum must be taken with an Honors-option. Candidates for Honors in English will arrange for an Honors-option by contracting with any professor teaching a 5000-level course to do honors-level work in that course. Supplementary work required for the Honors-option might consist of an extra paper, a longer term paper, evidence of additional readings (for example, through journal entries), an oral or written report on an aspect of criticism, a special examination, or the like.

Students who wish to become candidates for degrees with honors in English are encouraged to consult early with the Undergraduate Adviser of the English Department (313-577-7701).

Graduate Enrollment Program, Accelerated (AGRADE)

The English Department invites academically superior majors to petition for admission to the `AGRADE' (Accelerated Graduate Enrollment) Program. `AGRADE' procedures enable qualified seniors to enroll simultaneously in the undergraduate and graduate programs of the Department and to apply a maximum of fifteen credits toward both a bachelor's and a master's degree. Students admitted to the `AGRADE' Program may be able to complete both degrees in five years of full-time study. An `AGRADE' applicant should petition the Director of Graduate Studies of the English Department for admission. Applications will be accepted no earlier than the semester in which ninety credits are completed. Applicants must have an overall grade point average at the `cum laude' level (approximately 3.4) and not less than a 3.6 g.p.a in the major courses already completed. If a student's petition is accepted, a designated faculty adviser will develop a graduate Plan of Work, specifying the `AGRADE' courses to be included in subsequent semesters.

For more details about the `AGRADE' Program, contact the Director of Graduate Studies in English: 313-577-2450.

Combined Curriculum Requirements

Combined Curriculum For Secondary Teaching: An English major who wishes to prepare for a career in secondary school teaching must complete either the regular program for majors or the Honors Program. See: Secondary Teaching, Combined Curriculum for.

Combined Curriculum With Dentistry, Law, Or Medicine: (See: Combined Degrees and Second Degrees.) Students who wish to major in English and receive the Bachelor of Arts degree by the end of their first professional year of study must complete six courses in English beyond the General Education and Liberal Arts and Sciences Group Requirements. At least four of these must be above the 2000 level.

Cognate Study in English

College and University Requirements: All students in the University must pass English 1020 (Introductory College Writing), and an intermediate composition course. Those students whose scores on the English Qualifying Examination, taken prior to matriculation, indicate need for instruction and practice in composition will be placed in English 1010 (Basic Writing) before they take English 1020. (To take the English Qualifying Examination, students must apply upon admission to: Testing and Evaluation Services.)

In addition, designated English courses may be used toward fulfillment of the College and University Philosophy and Letters requirement (see: Philosophy and Letters Group Requirement (PL)).

Courses at the 2000 and 3000 level (except English 3100) are open to all undergraduates who have completed 1020. Courses at the 5000 level are open to both undergraduates and M.A. students. Senior standing is prerequisite to undergraduates' admission to all 6000-level courses. Only graduate students may register for 7000- and 8000-level courses.

Students should note that some English courses have general titles which are constant while specific sub-titles change each semester. Students may elect such courses more than once, up to the maximum number of credits allowed.

English: Minor

The minor in English requires six courses beyond freshman composition for a minimum of at least eighteen credits:

1. One course from the following: English 3110, 3120, and 3140

2. One 5000-level literature course from English 5080 through 5590

3. Two courses selected from the following: English 2200, 3110, 3120, 3140, or approved 5000-level courses

4. Two English electives

No 1000-level course and not more than two 2000-level courses will count toward the minor.

The minor in English permits study in literature, film and literature, folklore, creative writing, linguistics, and expository writing.

Folklore: English Minor in

The English minor in folklore is for students interested in the analysis of the oral and material aspects of a traditional culture. It requires a minimum of six courses: English 2600, 3600, 5600, 5650, and 5670, and a cognate course selected from appropriate offerings in English or other departments. Folklore minors should consult with the undergraduate folklore adviser (313-577-7708) to set up an appropriate program. Not more than two courses at the 2000 level will count toward the minor, and no 1000-level course will count.

Film Studies (B.A. Program)

The University offers two undergraduate degree programs related to film: the Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Film offered by the College of Fine, Performing, and Communications Arts (for requirements see: Film Major (B.A. Program)), and the Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Film Studies described below .

The English Department offers a program in film and media studies for students interested in the history and criticism of film and media. Courses are designed to give students knowledge and critical skills in film analysis, key concepts in film theory, the major directors, emerging trends in new media scholarship, and an understanding of cultural and historical factors in film and media production and reception. A wide range of up-to-date courses give students an interesting and valuable set of critical skills in media and film scholarship.

Please contact Robert Burgoyne in the Department of English for further information.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS for this degree program are satisfied by the general requirements for undergraduate admission to the University; see: Admission Requirements and ACT Score Requirement.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Candidates for the bachelor's degree must complete 120 credits in course work including satisfaction of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Group Requirements (see: Group Requirements) and the University General Education Requirements (see: General Education Requirements), as well as the major requirements listed below. All course work must be completed in accordance with the academic procedures of the University and the College governing undergraduate scholarship and degrees; see: Bachelor's Degree Requirements, Academic Regulations, University, and Bachelor's Degree Requirements: Liberal Arts and Sciences.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: Students majoring in film studies must complete a minimum of thirty-five credits, distributed as follows:

CORE COURSES (Fifteen Credits)
COM 1600 -- Intro: Audio-TV-Film Production: Cr. 3
COM 2020 -- (VP) History of Film (ENG 2460): Cr. 3
COM 4997 -- Senior Assessment Essay in Film Studies: Cr. 1
COM 5993 or ENG 5993
-- (WI) Writing Intensive Course: Cr. 0
-- (WI) Writing Intensive Course in English. Cr. 0
ENG 2450 -- (VP) Introduction to Film (COM 2010): Cr. 4
ENG 5040 -- Film Criticism and Theory: Cr. 4
ELECTIVE COURSES (Twenty Credits)

Students should consult with their advisor in selecting electives. Electives should be selected in conjunction with either the English or Communication Department.

AFS 3200 -- The African American Film Experience: Cr. 4
COM 3990 -- Directed Study: Cr. 1-4 (Max. 6)
COM 5020 -- Studies in Film History: Cr. 4 (Max. 12)
COM 5060 -- Documentary and Non-Fiction Film and Television: Cr. 4
COM 5270 -- Screenwriting: Cr. 3
COM 5400 -- Techniques of Film and Video Production: Cr. 4
COM 5440 -- Film Production: Cr. 4
COM 6680 -- Individual Projects in Media Arts & Studies: Cr. 3 (Max. 6)
ENG 3040 -- Major Works of World Cinema: Cr. 4
ENG 5050 -- Concepts in Film Studies: Cr. 3-4 (Max. 12)
ENG 5060 -- Styles and Genres in Film: Cr. 4 (Max. 12)
ENG 5070 -- Topics in Film: Cr. 4 (Max. 12)
ITA 5150 -- Italian Cinema Since 1942: Cr. 3 (Max. 9)
SLA 3710 -- (VP) Russian & East Europn. Film (ARM/POL/RUS 3710): Cr. 3

Film Studies: English Minor in

Completion of a minor in film studies requires nineteen credits including ENG 2450 / COM 2010 and any other selections from either the core or elective courses cited above under the Bachelor of Arts major program.

Scholarships

See Scholarships and Financial Aid; also see: Financial Aid, Office of Student. For further information, contact the Department Office.

Gilbert R. and Patricia K. Davis Endowed Scholarship for English Majors: Award open to part-time students majoring in English in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, with a g.p.a. of 3.0 or above and a minimum of fifteen credits in residence at Wayne State University. Recipients must be Michigan residents. Contact the English Department for details.

Loughead-Eldredge Endowed Scholarships in Creative Writing: Awards open to advanced undergraduates and M.A. students in good academic standing who are pursuing a B.A. or M.A. in English with a concentration in creative writing. Contact the English Department for details.

Albert Feigenson Endowed Memorial Scholarship: Awards open to full-time undergraduate and graduate students majoring in music or English, with high scholastic standing and demonstrated financial need. Contact the English Department and the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid.

Doretta Burke Sheill Endowed Memorial Scholarship: Awards open to undergraduate and graduate students majoring in English literature who demonstrate high scholastic achievement, character, leadership, and financial need. Contact the English Department and the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid.

Stephen H. Tudor Memorial Scholarship in Creative Writing: Awards open to full-time degree-seeking students majoring in English who have completed at least fifteen credits in residence and demonstrate high achievement in creative writing. Contact the English Department for details.

Pearl Applebaum Warn Endowed Scholarship in English: Award open to returning full- or part-time female students age 27 years and older, with high scholastic achievement and demonstrated financial need. Contact the English Department for details.

Joseph J. and Mary E. Yelda Endowed Scholarship for English: Award open to full-time students who graduated from a metropolitan Detroit area high school, are majoring in English in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and have a g.p.a. of 3.0 or above. Awarded on the basis of academic merit and financial need. Contact the English Department for details.